The History of West Vancouver

West Vancouver started out as a settlement for European immigrants back in the 1870s and has slowly but surely transformed itself into one of Canada’s wealthiest municipalities. A new legislation called the Town Planning Act was passed which prohibited new industry consequently turning the municipal into a purely residential one.

west-vancouver-historical-siteWest Vancouver real estate reputation as a ‘residential haven from the city grew’ with the setting up of the ferry system and with the growth of the village- style neighborhoods of Dundarave and Ambleside. The major turning point in the fortunes of West Vancouver was during the Great Depression when A.J.T Taylor, a real estate developer and former engineer from Victoria, persuaded the Guinness family of London to buy 4700 acres in the Upper Lands in exchange for one million dollars in improvements over the course of the next five years. As a bonus, the Guinness family also agreed to finance the construction of the Lions Gate Bridge. The bridge would make connect West Vancouver to the city center for the first time ever, making vehicular transport to and fro possible.

In 1933, the Guinness family then enlisted the services of the Olmstead Brothers, a respected landscaping firm based in Boston, whose resume boasted several world-famous landmarks including New York’s Central Park. Their task this time was to design the British Pacific Properties as an exclusive recluse from the pressures and hassles of city living. This project would feature serene recreational parks, malls, bridges, roads and magnificent homes. Nothing like this had been seen before and this project was definitely the first of its kind. In retrospect, this innovative and trailblazing project set the tone for future real estate endeavors, further cementing West Vancouver’s reputation as an emerging, unique and affluent community.

The Lions Gate Bridge was finally completed in 1938 at a staggering cost of almost six million dollars, a hefty amount during this period. Other than providing much needed job opportunities for the locals in the midst of the Great Depression, the bridge made the Capilano Estates (present day British Pacific Properties) more accessible. Increased accessibility made the estates more attractive to potential home buyers.

The completion of the bridge also started a chain reaction of other real estate projects, for instance along Hollyburn Ridge. The net effect was a 180 degree transformation of the entire area as more schools, recreational parks, roads, bridges and other social amenities to be used by the new residents were built. Upon its completion in 1950, the British Properties boasted Canada’s first ever covered shopping mall, the Park Royal Mall.

The company has not looked back since and has been involved in the building of thousands of homes in emerging neighborhoods west of the British Properties. Westhill, Chartwell, Whitby’s Estates, Taylor’s Lookout and Highgrove Place are examples of such neighborhoods.

WEST VANCOUVER: YESTERDAY and TODAY

West Vancouver is on the ancestral and unceded territory belonging to the Coast Salish People, in particular the Squamish Tsleil-Waututh, Tsleil-Waut Musqueam First Nations.

The District of West Vancouver, stretching along 28 km of shoreline and along into the steep slopes of Hollyburn Ridge, began as an extremely popular destination for summer vacations and has evolved into an extremely wealthy North Shore municipality.

The Skwxwu7mesh Uxwumixw (Squamish Villages, people and communities) were the people who ruled and controlled the territory for centuries before written time. It was the First Nations village at the river’s mouth Capilano River became the Capilano Indian Reserve (Xwemelch’stn) in 1923. It was a legal entity separate from the district of West Vancouver.

When Vancouver was founded in the latter part of the 19th century, and expanded in the 20th century, the residents of the city walked across Burrard Inlet from the city to camp or picnic on the beaches of West Vancouver. In the end, they settled in several tiny, self-contained communities which were aligned to the shoreline, and over time, began to climb into the mountains. The natural topography divided the early settlements from later ones and helped identify the West Vancouver neighbourhoods.

The District of West Vancouver was incorporated on March 15th, 1912, and took the responsibility for what was part in the District of North Vancouver.

Other than the issue of logging, the municipality was not a magnet for commerce. In an effort to turn that negativity into something positive, the First Official Community Plan under the Town Planning Act of 1926 prohibited any new business and required the building of lots that were bigger than other areas in the Lower Mainland.

We are pleased to announce that our West Vancouver Timeline will always remain “a work in development”. We are open to suggestions on historic events that aren’t currently included on the Timeline.

We recognize that we’re located on the ancestral, traditional and unceded territories of the Squamish Nation Tsleil-Waututh Nation, the Squamish Nation as well as the Musqueam Nation. We recognize and revere these nations as distinct peoples on this region and also their historical connection to the land and water around us since the beginning of time.

Credits: Content is sourced was sourced from the West Vancouver Museum & Archives. The material was that was collected by Hugh Johnston and Dave Barker, West Vancouver Historical Society, Rupert Harrison, District of West Vancouver along with The West Vancouver Museum and Archives. From pre-contact up to 1938, the book was written by and modified in the hands of Gallery Guide Volunteer Yvonne Wilson in March 2003.

The decision drew the attention of the attention of a group of British investors headed by the Guinness family, who purchased majority part of the Upper Lands and began to develop the British Properties in 1932. The Guinness family built the Lions Gate Bridge (1937-38) to be the first bridge that was fixed to Vancouver and later constructed an additional bridge, the Capilano Golf Course and the north portion of Park Royal, one of the first shopping centers in Canada in the 1950s.

Ambleside was the first subdivision that was built in a gridiron design with commercial space that ran along Marine Drive. John Lawson Park was named after one of West Van’s founding members. Dundarave was named after the Scottish castle which belonged to the Macnaghten clan. the early resident R.E. Macnaghten. Caulfeild is ascribed to the Francis William Caulfeild the Englishman who planned an English-style community following the natural contours, including the tracks of cows and wild animals. Prior to 1931 which was the year Dan Sewell opened a marina and Whytecliff Lodge in Horseshoe Bay There were just a few families that resided there all year round.

Since automobile ownership increased in the years following 1945, new neighborhoods were created in the upper regions. Altamont is one of them that has large areas, mature trees beautiful landscaping, and the narrow streets which give the homes appearance of estates in the countryside.

The year 1959 saw 20 hectares land was rezoned and allowed hundreds of high-density apartment structures to be built within Ambleside as well as Hollyburn. In the 1960s, The Crescent Apartments (1961) is the first high-rise in West Vancouver. A few apartment buildings of the time, including Villa Maris, also known as the Pink Palace, have paint shades inspired by the pastel palettes that was prevalent in Miami, Florida.

Between 1945 and in 1975 West Vancouver was a center of creative residential design which became known by the term West Coast Style, which was greatly influenced to an extent by the stunning landscape and the use in wood for construction material. There were hundreds of West Coast modern houses were created by skilled architects like Arthur Erikson, Ron Thom, Charles Edward (Ned) Pratt, Fred Hollingsworth and Barry Downs.

The population and the variety of Metro Vancouver region have grown as well, so has the population increased the population of West Vancouver. Comparatively to a few decades ago, West Vancouver has a larger proportion of residents over the age of 65 and a lesser percentage of kids or young people. The average income is more than they were previously, and land values have increased dramatically and the population is becoming more varied.

The West Vancouver’s cultural and ethnic diverse population is drawn from Asia as well as Europe, the Middle East and Europe, in addition to other places across BC in BC and Canada. Its Squamish First Nation which has its land adjacent to the eastern boundary to West Vancouver, is a important partner of the District.

The District has no industry, and has the same activities that attracted the first visitors including forests, beaches and mountain trails golf courses, along with ski runs. Residents place a lot of value on the natural setting recreation opportunities, high-quality amenities for the community and an extensive culture.

1000

Squamish as well as Burrard Peoples lived on the North Shore for millennia before record-keeping began.

1791

1791 The first European observation of the West Vancouver to come. West Vancouver

The pilot Don Jose Narvaez passed through English Bay and explored the northwest region to Jervis Inlet on the 36-foot sailing vessel Santa Saturnia.

1792

1792: On the 3rd of July Capt. George Vancouver entered First Narrows and began to explore Burrard Inlet.

First Nations peoples from the village of Holmulchesun were welcoming him. The village was located near the river’s mouth. Capilano River.

1858

1858 In the year of the Gold Rush, BC became a British Colony. In 1858, the North Shore is surveyed and property is bought.

1859

1859 Captain Richards was surveyed on the H.M.S. Plumper and suggested that the Burrard Inlet as a more secured harbour for settlements and the railway.

He stated his belief that it was more accessible by land. South Shore was more accessible via land. Richards chose Point Atkinson as a British Naval Reserve.

1863

In 1863, Corporal Turner from the British Royal Engineers completed a survey to define areas of Reserve No.5, home of the Squamish Nation located near the mouth of the Capilano River.

1868

1868: 1868: John “Navvy Jack” Thomas, who began the first ferry service across the Burrard Inlet, began extracting gravel and sand from the west bank of the Capilano River.

The material was used in the production of concrete and was shipped in his five-ton sloops to the construction site at Moodyville, Hastings and Gastown.

1869

In 1869, Sewell Moody secured timber leases on both sides of the Capilano.

1870

The year was 1870. Sewell Moody bought in 1864 the Pioneer Mill in 1864, purchased two leases of timber to the west along the Capilano River.

It extended the west shore from Cypress Creek to Point Atkinson and was eventually depleted of the timber that was available. The larger lease was extended west starting at 22nd Street to the Capilano River and north until the mouth from Brothers Creek. Moody’s main camp in Ambleside continued to operate until the 1880s.

1872

1872: James Blake became the first landowner who was not native to West Vancouver, pre-empting 160 acres along the banks of Lawson Creek (l7th Street).

1873

1873 John “Navvy Jack” Thomas was married to the daughter of Chief Capilano, bought his half stake in the Granville Hotel and arranged to pre-empt Blake’s pre-emption. He then constructed a house in his honor for the bride.

1874

In 1874, Arthur Finney began construction of a lighthouse made of wood on May 4th in Point Atkinson.

The lanterns used for Point Atkinson arrived in January and in March, the initial Light Keeper Edwin Woodward began work with a pay of $800. The first preemption of Bowen Island by William Eaton.

1876

1876 The first children of settlers was born at West Vancouver; Christine Thomas at the Navvy Jack Point and James Atkinson Woodward at Point Atkinson.

1877

The year was 1877. Josias Charles Hughes preempted the 121 acres of Ambleside in the region between Blake’s property as well as the Capilano Indian Reserve.

Isaac Fisher, a New Westminster banker, has filed the claim for mineral pre-emption for the Whytecliff area.

1882

1882 The B.C. government suspended pre-emption privileges and cancelled the ones on which the necessary improvements had not been completed in order to avoid speculation on land until the site of the railway’s terminus been established.

1885

1885 the first commuter “Navvy Jack” Thomas was a rowboat user who used for his commute from Vancouver from his residence in the West Vancouver waterfront.

1886

1886: The railroad terminus was constructed in 1886, and then it was also the year that City of Vancouver incorporated in April.

The 13th of June saw all the land east from Hastings Mill burnt to the ground. Shoreline in West Vancouver was rapidly pre-empted. The pattern of settlement along the water was determined from the early settler’s’ dependence on the river and the inaccessibility to land. A road survey team ran the first trail between Capilano up to Eagle Harbour but this was quickly mowed. Construction began on the very first Capilano Dam.

The first land preemptors from West Vancouver were: J.P. Hughes “Navvy Jack” Thomas J.R. Chapman J. McCormack A.N.C. King P.A. Allen Stan James Murray Thain Peter Larson Ed Collett Nils Frolander Capt. Westerlunder A. Nelson Capt. Alcock Richard Gosse J.C. Wilson. The inaccessibility of land was a barrier to further preemption until 1891.

1890

1990: Canessas Fish Smokehouse began operating on Eagle Island. Pilot Cutter “Claymore” based in Pilot Cove.

1891

1891 The City of North Vancouver was created, which encompassed all of present-day West Vancouver.

The prospect of a road that would connect to Eagle Harbour stimulated a new increase in pre-emptions and other land speculation. A group of investors led by Burrard Inlet Coal Co. was instrumental in promoting sales of residence land within Newcastle. City of Newcastle. The name was used to describe the early years of West Vancouver; the company also claimed that it had large coal deposits. Much like many advertisements of the time the plan was a failure along with the planned road construction. The severe recession of the 1890’s drained the speculation on land.

1892

1892: In an attempt to draw settlers, North Vancouver negotiated a loan ($40,000 for 50 years at 8.8%) to construct an open road or wagon trail that ran from Deep Cove to Eagle Harbour.

14 years will pass before this road can be completed West Vancouver. J.C. Keith who underwrote the loan, gave the name of his road.

1791

The first European observation in West Vancouver. The pilot Don Jose Narvaez passed through English Bay and explored the northwest region to Jervis Inlet with the 36-foot Sloop Santa Saturnia.

1792

On July 3 , Captain George Vancouver entered First Narrows and explored Burrard Inlet. First Nations peoples from the village of Holmulchesun situated near the mouth of Capilano River, greeted him.

1858

The B.C. mainland was declared to be as a British Colony.

Surveyor S.J. Dawson suggested to the Canadian Government that the West Vancouver area be the location of the Transcontinental Railway.

1859

Captain Richards conducted a survey on the H.M.S. Plumper and suggested that the Burrard Inlet as a more secure harbour for settlement as well as railway. He noted that the South Shore was more accessible through land.

Richards chose Point Atkinson as a British Naval Reserve.

1863

Captain Turner who was part of The British Royal Engineers completed a survey that defined reserve boundaries. No. 5, home to the Squamish Nation situated near the mouth of the Capilano River.

1868

John “Navvy Jack” Thomas who established with the very first ferry crossing through Burrard Inlet, began extracting sand and gravel from the west bank of the Capilano River. The material was later used to make concrete, and was shipped on his five-ton sloop construction locations at Moodyville, Hastings and Gastown.

1869

Sewell Moody secured timber leases on both the sides of Capilano.

1870

Sewell Moody who bought his Pioneer Mill in 1864, obtained two timber leases to the west from the Capilano River. The lease was smaller and extended along the west shore of Cypress Creek to Point Atkinson and was eventually depleted of timber available. The larger lease was extended to the east, beginning at 22nd Street to the Capilano River and north until the source from Brothers Creek. Moody’s principal camp at Ambleside continued to operate until the 1890’s.

1872

James Blake became the first non-native landowner in West Vancouver, pre-empting 160 acres along the banks of Lawson Creek (17th Street).

1873

John “Navvy Jack” Thomas who was married to the daughter of Chief Capilano, decided to sell his half stake in the Granville Hotel and arranged to take over Blake’s pre-emption . He also constructed a home in his honor for the bride.

1874

Arthur Finney began construction of a lighthouse constructed of wooden on May 4th, at Point Atkinson.

1875

The lanterns to Point Atkinson arrived in January and in March , the First Lightkeeper, Edwin Woodward began work with a pay of $800.

The first pre-emption was made on Bowen Island by William Eaton.

1876

The first children of settlers have been brought up at West Vancouver; Christine Thomas at the Navvy Jack Point and James Atkinson Woodward at Point Atkinson.

1877

Josias Charles Hughes preempted 121 acres in Ambleside which is the area between Tomase’s property as well as Capilano Indian Reserve. Capilano Indian Reserve.

Isaac Fisher, a New Westminster banker, has filed the claim for mineral pre-emption for the Whytecliff area.

1882

The B.C. government suspended preemption privileges and cancelled the ones on where the necessary improvements were not made in order to avoid speculation on land until the place of the railway’s terminus was decided.

1885

One of the first commuters, “Navvy Jack” Thomas, utilized a rowboat for his commute from Vancouver from his residence at the West Vancouver waterfront.

1886

The terminus for the railway was built as well as it was also the City of Vancouver incorporated in April. On June 13, all the land east from Hastings Mill burnt to the ground. Shoreline in West Vancouver was rapidly pre-empted. The pattern of settlement on the water was influenced from the early settler’s’ dependence on the river and the lack of land access. A road survey crew walked the first trail between Capilano towards Eagle Harbour but this was quickly mowed.

The construction began on the first Capilano Dam.

1890

Canessas Fish Smokehouse operating on Eagle Island. Pilot Cutter “Claymore” based in Pilot Cove.

1891

In the year 1898, the City of North Vancouver was created, which encompassed all of West Vancouver. The total population was about 300.

The promise of a highway towards Eagle Harbour stimulated a new increase in pre-emptions and other land speculation. A group of investors led of the Burrard Inlet Coal Co. encouraged sales of residence land within Newcastle. City of Newcastle. The name was that was used to describe the early days of West Vancouver; the company also claimed that it had an enormous coal mine. As with many other campaigns of the day this one was not successful and so did the plans for road construction. The depressed economic times in the 1890’s depleted the speculation on land.

1892

In an attempt to draw the arrival of settlers, North Vancouver negotiated a loan ($40,000 for 50 years at 8percent) to construct the road or trail for wagons starting from Deep Cove to Eagle Harbour. 14 years will pass before this road can be completed West Vancouver.

J.C. Keith who underwrote the loan named his name on the road.

1893

The first school was established at Bowen Island; Mr. William Acheson was employed to teach at a cost of $50 per month.

1897

The Whiteside and Burnham Cannery erected at Eagle Harbour at August Nelson’s incomplete mill site. The cannery was operational as late in 1918.

John Cates ran a ferry service to Bowen Island.

1898

The Defiance Canning Company was constructed in Sandy Cove and was operated by a variety of owners until the 1950’s. It is now an Fisheries Research Station. Francis Wm. Caulfeild bought an acreage in Skunk Cove from Balfor Ker. Ker bought his property from Nils Frolander, who was the first pre-emptor. Ker let his Pilot Boat Captains construct”the “Pilot House” just outside the Cove. Caulfeild cost the Pilots one dollar per month for the rental to ensure that the pilots have no right to the property.

1902

There were a few early residents living were living in West Vancouver. They were able to earn money by selling farm products to the mill for lumber at Moodville within North Vancouver. Other employees were employed by the Great Northern Cannery (although the work was seasonal , and the majority of employees were on the move). Many came just to take in the beautiful scenery and the tranquility of their holiday homes.

1905

The sale order was in default of a mortgage of $1320 was issued against the estate John “Navvy Jack” Thomas. J.C. Keith then purchased the property.

A eight-mile bolt flume of shingle along Capilano. Capilano is now complete.

1906

On November 1, John Lawson purchased the Navvy Jack Thomas property from J.C. Keith. On the 6th of December Lawson leases a portion of his waterfront property to McNair Timber Co. Ltd. to be used as a railroad log dump as well as a booming ground. The annual rent was $35.

1907

McNair-Fraser Lumber Corp. constructed a logging railroad that was constructed starting at the pier that was on 16th Street. It ran from the pier on 16th Street waterfront north east to the middle of the 1200 block Inglewood until around 11th Street where it turned north before reversing to the north, passing through Brothers Creek. Two camps were located: the lower one was located near 11th Street and the upper about 1 mile beyond. The lower camp was home to large stables with a cookhouse as well as a bunkhouse. The upper camp had the blacksmith’s workshop, 3 bunkhouses, a cookhouse that was a combination as well as a store and dining hall.

1908

The McNair-Fraser Lumber Co. needed something other than a train to deal with the hilly terrain of West Vancouver in order to reach the logging areas, so they bought a cable engine that was unique, dubbed”Walking Dudley. “Walking Dudley”. The Dudley was able to make four journeys in the course of a 10 hour day with a trail of 10 to 16 logs per trip.

In the beginning, Presbyterian and Methodist Church services were held at John Lawson’s residence.

1907-1913

The provincial government split areas of land that had road allowances based on a typical grid of North, South East, West grid. Contrary to the divisions found in Caulfeild and later, the British Properties, the grid does not take into consideration topography. This means that roads tend to go straight up hills and do not follow contours. This causes steep slopes and a tendency to flood.

1909

John Lawson began the development of the Hollyburn area.

A ferry service running between West Vancouver and Vancouver harbour was established. There is also a daily ferry service up to Bowen Island from Vancouver.

A dynamite plant is inaugurated in Bowen Island and a number of explosions that were accidental result in an inquiry and a juries’ recommendation that the rules books be written in Chinese because the Chinese workers are not able to read English instructions and warnings.

1910

The North Vancouver District Council built an wharf in Hollyburn (17th Street) at an expense of $9,000. The wharf’s exposed location meant it was not suitable for ferry operations. it was also too small and didn’t extend to deep water. However, this did not stop it from being used by ferry companies between 1909 until 1912. It became a draw for fishermen, tourists and younger people.

The foundations of the Presbyterian Church were laid at the southeast corner of 18th and Marine Drive.

On April 24, a two-day forest fire threatened the upper camp of the McNairs log-logging operations.

1911

A few summer cottages and tents were scattered along the shores of West Vancouver.

Miss Mary Reid came from Ontario to instruct the 14 girls and boys aged between 5 and 14 who lived in West Vancouver. The students ranged between 5-14. Prior to her arrival, the children were required to walk across to the Keith Road to North Vancouver.

In the beginning, before the Presbyterian Church was completed, the services were held in a temporary tent. However, one day the tent was able to collapse due to the force of snow that fell heavily and a stronger temporary structure had to be built. In order to pay for the expenses of the new structure, a option was taken that it would be rented out to the school board to be used as an educational building.

1912

West Vancouver becomes a separate District Municipality. The division in North Vancouver and West Vancouver was amicable – even during discussions about the terms in the North Shore Council adopted the by-law of $100,000 to enhance Keith Road and to build Marine Drive. Charles Nelson was elected first Reeve (mayor) and the first Municipal Hall was constructed at an the cost of $3500.

In the event of separation, West Vancouver assumed $156,000 of the debt of North Vancouver, which was $54,300,000 (a massive amount for 700 people). The debt was put up to pay construction costs and other services.

In 1912, at the end of the year the school’s population was at 44.

The Council attempted to promote industry (fish canneries or the logging industry).

The Clachan hotel was built in the name of the Stevenson sisters on the east end of 25th Street and the waterfront.

David Rogers built a timber mill on top of McNairs upper camp. The Walking Dudley’s trail was extended to connect the mill.

1913

The Conservative Hall is located in Dundarave.

Children’s first lessons from the Dundarave region were held in the Conservative Hall with Miss MacKay as their principal. They were moved to a brand new two-room schoolhouse in 1918 on where was Altamont Hospital.

A two-room schoolhouse named Hollyburn was constructed in the year that Mrs. Lillian Smith became principal.

In July, the ferry service relocated to the lower part of 14th Street, where a new ferry pier, freight shed as well as a ticketing office was constructed. (Today this ticket counter is referred to by The Ferry Building Gallery).

First St. Stephens Church was constructed.

Campbell and O’Conner opened a lumber mill on 3rd Street and Mathers.

F.W. Cardinell Shingle Mill builds at 27th Street and Marine.

1914

The Pacific Great Eastern (P.G.E.) passenger train made its first service from Dundarave on January 1st. The train on January 2 was sunk near 24th Street.

The first Methodist Church was located at 2200 Fulton.

A pier was built in Dundarave to facilitate transportation to those who live in the vicinity.

McNair and Fraser Lumber Co. The company has ceased operations.

Hollyburn Lumber Company opened a mill on 14th Street and Fulton.

1915

Marine Drive from Caulfeild was officially inaugurated.

1916

The Dundarave Pier, which was built in 1914 was not used to its fullest capacity and was shut down in favor of a bus service. The bus service was launched from 25th Street, the bus was able to hold 12 passengers and operated at an hourly rate.

1917

Logging was an important business with seven operators and many small companies establishing lumber mills, shingle mills, and logging operations located in West Vancouver.

1918

The Council took the decision to acquire the right to foreshore at Horseshoe Bay, Copper Cove and Fisherman’s Cove. The Council decided to now manage all foreshores, and had to decide on taking over existing housing.

A 10,877-foot timber flume was constructed by an McNair, Fraser Lumber Co. mill located on Hollyburn Ridge to the P.G.E. Station on Sharon Drive.

1918 – 1920

Schools grew due to an opening at Cypress Park School and the 22nd Street School (Pauline Johnson).

1919

The West Vancouver Courier, the first newspaper to be regularly published, began to appear. The paper was published until 1921.

1921

A school with a single room in a privately owned house was established at the Whyte Cliff region.

1922

The invention of electricity was not until the time when oil lamps, coal and wood stoves were in use.

It is said that skiing at Hollyburn Mountain was started by three Scandinavians who used the abandoned bunkhouses for logging as their cabins. The area surrounding the cabins was previously cut down and opened up for ski cross-country. The late 1920’s saw them were moving higher up the hill, to create the ski areas in First Lake. The ski jump was constructed on the east side of First Lake.

1925

The new St. Stephens Church was constructed. The old church was converted into the church hall. A little bit of logs were still cut as a part of clearing land.

1926

The Council introduced The Town Planning Act and zoning By-laws to guarantee a high quality residential zone that is not dominated by industries. West Vancouver becomes a strictly residential community.

The Library was relocated from its previous home located in Gemmill’s Drug Store at the northwest corner 14th Street and Bellevue to an updated home on near the intersection of 14th Street and Marine.

Hollyburn Theatre opened with five vaudeville shows as well as an “Great Battle Play” named “The Dark Angel’.

A single mill of immense size was demolished to make an area to build an Inglewood School.

1927

Gleneagles Golf Course opened.

Hollyburn Pacific Ski Club was established.

Inglewood School was opened as the West Vancouver High School.

First, an apartment building was constructed within West Vancouver, called “Appleton Court”. (The West End of the present West Vancouver Municipal Hall is located on this site located at 17th Street and Esquimalt.

1931

It was formed when the British Pacific Properties Limited company was founded.

The Sewell family moved to Horseshoe Bay to set up an enterprise for renting boats.

The very first May Day was celebrated in West Vancouver and the first Queen, Peggy Barker was chosen. May Day continued until 1973.

1938

Lions Gate Bridge opened to traffic. The official opening, in 1939 was presided by H.M. King George VI.

The West Vancouver population at the time was 8,324. West Vancouver at that time was 8,324 people.

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